Reviews

The Christian Science Monitor, March 25, 2003, Marjorie Coeyman

“Penn-Nabrit is candid about the things she felt she could have done better.  Each chapter finishes with advice for parents, most of which transcends issues of both race and homeschooling.  Ultimately, this is a how-to book for parents with children of any color, but it carries with it a troubling subtext: These talented young men might have remained in public school if their parents had believed they would get a fair shake.”

 

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, Spring 2003, Shirlee Taylor Haizlip ’59
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“Penn-Nabrit offers a heartfelt yet Socratic rumination on what it means to be educated. She and her husband wanted a ‘classic’ education for their sons-including arts, humanities, science, mathematics, geography, current events, economics and French. Their goal was a ‘holistic balance’ and a striving for wisdom, excellence, and understanding. Threaded throughout the book are her observations of what it means to be black and what strategies blacks employ to maintain their sanity and safety in a country that does not always have their interests at heart.”
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The Crisis, July/August 2003, Michael Fletcher
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“The book provides a long list of practical tips that should be a useful resource to anyone considering home schooling…there is much to learn about the power of parental involvement in children’s education from the Nabrit’s home schooling experience. And these lessons are valuable to all parents who believe young people are mostly educated at home, regardless of where they attend school.”
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Black Issues Book Review”,1]
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// ]]>Wellesley Magazine
, Spring 2003, Shirlee Taylor Haizlip ’59 

“Penn-Nabrit offers a heartfelt yet Socratic rumination on what it means to be educated. She and her husband wanted a ‘classic’ education for their sons-including arts, humanities, science, mathematics, geography, current events, economics and French.  Their goal was a ‘holistic balance’ and a striving for wisdom, excellence, and understanding.  Threaded throughout the book are her observations of what it means to be black and what strategies blacks employ to maintain their sanity and safety in a country that does not always have their interests at heart.”

 

The Crisis, July/August 2003, Michael Fletcher

“The book provides a long list of practical tips that should be a useful resource to anyone considering home schooling…there is much to learn about the power of parental involvement in children’s education from the Nabrit’s home schooling experience.  And these lessons are valuable to all parents who believe young people are mostly educated at home, regardless of where they attend school.”

 

Black Issues Book Review, September-October